Sessions: 2010

Week #1: Tuesday, January 12

Course overview,
Introduction to Twitter

See:

  1. Sysomos: Inside the Political Twittersphere:
    http://www.sysomos.com/insidetwitter/politics
  2. Sysomos: An In-Depth Look Inside Twitter:
    http://www.sysomos.com/insidetwitter/

Sunday, January 17, 2010
• Deadline for withdrawal with tuition refund from winter-term courses.
• Last day to add winter-term courses.

Week #2: Tuesday, January 19

Twitter “Revolutions”

Video presented in class: Clay Shirky: “Protest Culture — Ad Hoc vs Institutional, and What it Means”

http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/berkmanat10/2008/02/shirkyberkman

Readings:

  1. “Rioters of the World Unite”
    (https://webography.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/rioters-of-the-world-unite.pdf)
  2. “Inside Moldova’s Twitter Revolution”
    (http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2009/04/inside-moldovas/)
  3. “Protests in Moldova Explode, With Help of Twitter”
    (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/08/world/europe/08moldova.html?hp)
  4. “Student Protests Are Turning Into A Twitter Revolution In Moldova”
    (http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/04/07/student-protests-are-turning-into-a-twitter-revolution-in-moldova/)
  5. “Students use Twitter to storm presidency in Moldova”
    (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/moldova/5119449/Students-use-Twitter-to-storm-presidency-in-Moldova.html)
  6. “Moldova’s Twitter Revolution”
    (http://neteffect.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2009/04/07/moldovas_twitter_revolution)
  7. “More analysis of Twitter’s role in Moldova”
    (http://neteffect.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2009/04/07/more_analysis_of_twitters_role_in_moldova)
  8. “The myth of the Moldova ‘Twitter revolution’”
    (http://frontlineclub.com/blogs/danielbennett/2009/04/the-myth-of-the-moldova-twitter-revolution.html)
  9. “Think Again: Twitter”
    (http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2009/08/06/think_again_twitter)
  10. “’Twitter revolution’ Moldovan activist goes into hiding”
    (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/apr/15/moldova-activist-hiding-protests)
  11. The Digi-Active Guide to Twitter for Activism:
    http://www.digiactive.org/wp-content/uploads/digiactive_twitter_guide_v1-0.pdf

Assignment due: present a short printed statement to the course director, circa 250 words at most, identifying and explaining your choice of political organization/ campaign/ movement/ cause/ activists. [See Step #1 above] (2.5% of the final course grade)

Other key task(s) to fulfil by Jan. 19: set up a Twitter account, and if possible a Diigo account, as per Step #2 above.

Week #3: Tuesday, January 26

The “Iranian Twitter Revolution,” Part One

Video presented in class: “Clay Shirky: How social media can make history” http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/clay_shirky_how_cellphones_twitter_facebook_can_make_history.html
Or
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_iN_QubRs0

Also see: TED Blog: “Q&A with Clay Shirky on Twitter and Iran”
http://blog.ted.com/2009/06/qa_with_clay_sh.php

Additional Videos:

  1. Twittering and Iran:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvyZkPj82y8
  2. Iran: The Twitter Revolution:
    http://www.box.net/shared/ea1ifeztpa
  3. Twitter, Our Window to Iran:
    http://www.box.net/shared/tz2d1sungp
  4. White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs on Twitter in Iran:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSv8OCF4x_U
  5. U.S. Secretary of Defense, Robert Gates, on Twitter in Iran:
    http://www.box.net/shared/8onyxvhzgx
  6. Hillary Clinton Supports Twitter Use in Iran:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNlYNYsSMDk
  7. Former Deputy National Security Advisor Recommends Twitter for Nobel Peace Prize:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfjjlZn4_Lc
  8. Jared Cohen, “Children of Jihad”:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lKA_NkHuJ8
  9. The Trouble with Tweeting About Iran:
    http://www.box.net/shared/4jgnbvell7

Readings:

  1. “Iran’s Wired Generation Challenges Ahmadinejad”
    (http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2009/06/irans-wired-generation-challenges-ahmadinejad/)
  2. “‘Where is My Vote?’: Iranian Expats Organize Online”
    (http://www.digiactive.org/2009/06/15/wimv/)
  3. “Iran can no longer suppress its youth”
    (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/personal-view/5543122/Iran-can-no-longer-suppress-its-youth.html)
  4. “Iran: networked dissent”
    (http://mondediplo.com/blogs/iran-networked-dissent)
  5. “The Revolution Will Be Twittered”
    (http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_dish/2009/06/the-revolution-will-be-twittered-1.html)
  6. “Iran’s Twitter Revolution”
    (http://www.fpif.org/articles/irans_twitter_revolution)
  7. “The Twitter Revolution”
    (http://motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2009/06/twitter-revolution)
  8. “Social Networks Spread Defiance Online”
    (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/16/world/middleeast/16media.html?_r=3&ref=media)
  9. “Iranians Protest Election, Tweeps Protest CNN”
    (http://tunedin.blogs.time.com/2009/06/15/iranians-protest-election-tweeps-protest-cnn/)
  10. “Iran, citizen media and media attention”
    (http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2009/06/18/iran-citizen-media-and-media-attention/)
  11. “U.S. State Department speaks to Twitter over Iran”
    (http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSWBT01137420090616?feedType=RSS&feedName=internetNews&rpc=22&sp=true)
  12. “Twitter Blog: Up, Up, and Away”
    (http://blog.twitter.com/2009/06/up-up-and-away.html)
  13. “Profile: The Kid at the State Department Who Figured Out the Iranians Should Be Allowed to Keep Tweeting”
    (http://www.mediabistro.com/baynewser/twitter/profile_the_kid_at_the_state_department_who_figured_out_the_iranians_should_be_allowed_to_keep_tweeting_119136.asp)
  14. “Condi’s Party Starter”
    (http://www.newyorker.com/talk/2007/11/05/071105ta_talk_lichtenstein)
  15. “Activists call on U.S. to provide unfettered Internet access to Iranian citizens”
    (http://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20090616_2671.php)
  16. “Washington Taps Into a Potent New Force in Diplomacy”
    (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/17/world/middleeast/17media.html?_r=3&scp=2&sq=Twitter&st=cse)
  17. “Twittercraft: Foreign Policy by Other Means”
    (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-shtenderauerbach/twittercraft-foreign-poli_b_226289.html)
  18. “ ‘Inane and Half-Baked’: Twitter Is the Forrest Gump of International Relations”
    (http://kara.allthingsd.com/20090616/inane-and-half-baked-twitter-is-the-forrest-gump-of-international-relations/?mod=ATD_rss)
  19. “Bush Advisor: Twitter Founders Should Get Nobel Peace Prize”
    (http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/06/22/former-deputy-national-security-advisor-twitter-founders-should-get-nobel-peace-prize/)
  20. “Cyberwar guide for Iran elections”
    (http://www.boingboing.net/2009/06/16/cyberwar-guide-for-i.html)
  21. “How (Twitter and) I Crashed Iran’s Propaganda Web Sites”
    (http://www.esquire.com/the-side/opinion/twitter-hacks-iran-election-propaganda-061809)
  22. “DDOS attacks on Iran’s web-sites: what a stupid idea!”
    (http://neteffect.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2009/06/15/ddos_attacks_on_irans_web_sites_what_a_stupid_idea)
  23. “Watch Out for Twitter Hype in the Iran Elections”
    (http://www.usnews.com/blogs/robert-schlesinger/2009/06/17/watch-out-for-twitter-hype-in-the-iran-elections.html)

Week #4: Tuesday, February 2

The “Iranian Twitter Revolution,” Part Two

.

Video presented in class: “Evgeny Morozov: How the Net aids dictatorships”

or
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hFk6FDrZBc

Additional Video:

  1. “Not quite Twitter, not quite a revolution”:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpQC-DJL_Ho

Readings:

  1. “America’s Iranian Twitter Revolution” (http://zeroanthropology.net/2009/06/17/americas-iranian-twitter-revolution/)
  2. “A Look at Twitter in Iran”
  3. (http://blog.sysomos.com/2009/06/21/a-look-at-twitter-in-iran/)
  4. “Can Twitter turn politics into profit?”
    (http://www.thenational.ae/article/20090621/BUSINESS/706219948/1137)
  5. “The Revolution Will NOT Be Twittered”
    (http://techpresident.com/blog-entry/revolution-will-not-be-twittered)
  6. “In Iran, The Revolution Will Be Tagged”
    (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=105679927)
  7. “It’s not a Twitter revolution in Iran”
    (http://www.zcommunications.org/znet/viewArticle/21814)
  8. “Iran Elections: A Twitter Revolution?”
    (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2009/06/17/DI2009061702232.html)
  9. “Iran’s “Twitter Revolution” — myth or reality?”
    (http://worldfocus.org/blog/2009/06/18/irans-twitter-revolution-myth-or-reality/5869/)
  10. “Iran’s Twitter Revolution? Maybe Not Yet: Some Iranian election protesters used Twitter to get people on the streets, but most of the organizing happened the old-fashioned way”
    (http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jun2009/tc20090617_803990.htm?campaign_id=rss_daily)
  11. “Doubting Twitter: Let’s not get carried away about its role in Iran’s demonstrations”
    (http://www.slate.com/id/2220736)
  12. “The repercussions of a ‘Twitter revolution’”
    (http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2009/06/20/the_repercussions_of_a_twitter_revolution/)
  13. “Twitter on the Barricades: Six Lessons Learned”
    (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/21/weekinreview/21cohenweb.html?_r=3)
  14. “The Fog Machine: Iran, Social Media and the Rise of Genetically Modified Grassroots Organizations”
    (http://www.counterpunch.org/bratich06222009.html)
  15. “Exposing Canada’s Role in US “Black-Ops” in Iran”
    (http://www.dominionpaper.ca/weblogs/dawn/2736)
  16. “More on Twitter and protests in Tehran”
    (http://neteffect.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2009/06/16/more_on_twitter_and_protests_in_tehran)
  17. “Iran’s crackdown proves that the ‘Twitter revolution’ has made things worse”
    (http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/willheaven/100002576/irans-crackdown-proves-that-the-twitter-revolution-has-made-things-worse/)
  18. “How Iran is using the internet to ‘hunt down’ online protesters”
    (http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/willheaven/100003235/how-iran-is-using-the-internet-to-hunt-down-online-protestors/)
  19. “Iran: Downside to the ‘Twitter Revolution’”
    (http://www.evgenymorozov.com/morozov_twitter_dissent.pdf)
  20. “The Iranian Election on Twitter: The First Eighteen Days”:
    (
    http://www.box.net/shared/z8a6log6g6)

Optional:

► “Updated: The Irony of Iran’s ‘Twitter Revolution’”
(http://www.gauravonomics.com/blog/the-irony-of-irans-twitter-revolution/)

► “The Irony of Iran’s ‘Twitter Revolution’”
(http://globalvoicesonline.org/2009/06/19/the-irony-of-irans-twitter-revolution/)

Assignment due: present a short printed statement to the course director, circa 500 words at most, describing and reflecting on your experience in entering Twitter, gaining access to the tweeter(s) at the focus of your research, disorientation experienced, and any initial impressions of Twitter use. [See Step #3 above] (5% of the final course grade)

Week #5: Tuesday, February 9

Readings:

[Cyberactivism] Introduction

[Cyberactivism] Ch.2, “Indymedia.org: A New Communications Commons”

[Cyberactivism] Ch. 3, “Classifying Forms of Online Activism: The Case of Cyberprotests against the World Bank”

Week #6: Tuesday, February 16

Readings:

[Cyberactivism] Ch. 4, “The Radicalization of Zeke Spier: How the Internet Contributes to Civic Engagement and New Forms of Social Capital”

[Cyberactivism] Ch. 5, “Democracy, New Social Movements, and the Internet: A Habermasian Analysis”

Assignment due: present a short printed statement to the course director, circa 750 words at most, describing (and analysing in the most preliminary way), the ostensible network of your tweeter(s) and how they build their ties through regular messaging and retweeting. [See Step #4 above]. (7.5% of the final course grade)

Week #7: Tuesday, February 23

Mid-Term Break: Feb. 22-28

Week #8: Tuesday, March 2

Readings:

[Cyberactivism] Ch. 7, “Mapping Networks of Support for the Zapatista Movement: Applying Social-Networks Analysis to the Study of Contemporary Social Movements”

[Cyberactivism] Epilogue: “Current Directions and Future Questions”

Assignment due: please direct the course coordinator either to your Diigo list, showing your collection of research notes to date, or if you did not use Diigo, please print out your research notes and submit them for the start of class today. (10% of the final course grade)

Monday, March 8, 2010
• Last day for academic withdrawal from two-term and winter-term courses.

Week #9: Tuesday, March 9

Read Shirky, chapters 1 & 2

Also read: A Digi-Active Introduction to Facebook Activism:
http://www.digiactive.org/wp-content/uploads/digiactive_facebook_activism.pdf

Week #10: Tuesday, March 16

Read Shirky, chapters 3 & 4

Assignment due: submit a short synthesis of the dominant narrative of the messages produced by those at the focus of your study, printed, in no more than 500 words, submitted for the start of class on Tuesday, March 16. [See Step #5 above] (5% of the final course grade)

Week #11: Tuesday, March 23

Read Shirky, chapters 5 & 6 & 7

Also examine: Quick ‘n’ Easy Guide to Online Advocacy:
http://onlineadvocacy.tacticaltech.org/

Week #12: Tuesday, March 30

Read Shirky, chapters 8 & 9

Assignment due: print out the main findings generated from each report, and conclude with a final paragraph on what conclusions you think you can draw from these analyses. Submit this for the start of class on Tuesday, March 30. [See Step #6] (10% of the final course grade)

Friday, April 2 through Monday, April 5: University closed

Week #13: Tuesday, April 6

Read Shirky, chapters 10 & 11 & Epilogue

Also examine: Blog for a Cause! The Global Voices Guide to Blog Advocacy, by Mary Joyce:
http://www.digiactive.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/03/gv_blog_advocacy2.pdf

And peruse: Cross-Posting for Advocacy: An Introduction to Effective Social Media Integration:
http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/wp-content/uploads/crossposting.pdf

Week #14: Wednesday, April 14

MAKE UP SESSION, 2:45pm to 5:30pm, MB-S1.255

Tuesday, April 20:

Assignment due: Please submit your research paper, no more than 2,500 words (not including references to published sources), in the office of the course coordinator (H-1125-11) on Tuesday, April 20, 2010, between 4:00pm and 5:00pm. If you cannot come during that hour, please submit your paper before then by depositing it in the mailbox marked Forte in the Department.

No papers will be accepted by email. Late papers receive an automatic grade of zero. No exceptions to this course policy will be allowed.

(35% of the final course grade)